Volume 6, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 78-82
Correlation Between Quality of Life and Severity of Valve Abnormalities in Children with Rheumatic Heart Disease
I Gusti Ayu Trisna Windiani, Department of Child Health, Udayana University Medical School, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Indonesia
Putu Diah Vedaswari, Department of Child Health, Udayana University Medical School, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Indonesia
Eka Gunawijaya, Department of Child Health, Udayana University Medical School, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Indonesia
Ni Putu Veny Kartika Yantie, Department of Child Health, Udayana University Medical School, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Indonesia
I Gusti Agung Ngurah Sugitha Adnyana, Department of Child Health, Udayana University Medical School, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Indonesia
Soetjiningsih, Department of Child Health, Udayana University Medical School, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Indonesia
Received: Feb. 12, 2020;       Accepted: Feb. 24, 2020;       Published: Mar. 3, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajp.20200602.11      View  343      Downloads  117
Abstract
Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is one of the chronic diseases that affects the heart valve and requires long-term treatment that can affect the quality of life. We aimed to determine the correlation between quality of life and severity of valve abnormalities in children with rheumatic heart disease. This was a cross-sectional study was performed to 28 children with RHD aged 2 to 18 years old who treated at Integrated Cardiovascular Outpatient Clinic of Sanglah General Hospital from March to April 2018. Patients suffering from other chronic diseases or neurodevelopmental disorders were excluded. Assessment of the quality of life using PedsQL version 4.0 Generic Core Scales questionnaire. Assessment of severity of valve abnormalities using echocardiographic score. Analysis was performed using Spearman correlation test, confident interval (CI) 95%, significant if p<0.05. We found the patients mean age was 12.75 years old and mostly men (18 subjects). Most isolated abnormality was mitral valve (17 subjects), with most involved more than one valve (22 subjects). Almost patients treated with Benzathine penicillin G (25 subjects) as secondary prophylaxis. The mean score of quality of life from the children’s report was 78.05 ± 14.66 and from the parent’ report was 79.69 ± 14.36. The lowest mean score of quality of life is from school function. Between quality of life and severity of valve abnormalities found a weak negative correlation (r = -0.377; p = 0.048). There was a weak negative correlation between quality of life and severity of valve abnormalities in children with rheumatic heart disease.
Keywords
Quality of Life, Children, Rheumatic Heart Disease, Echocardiographic Score
To cite this article
I Gusti Ayu Trisna Windiani, Putu Diah Vedaswari, Eka Gunawijaya, Ni Putu Veny Kartika Yantie, I Gusti Agung Ngurah Sugitha Adnyana, Soetjiningsih, Correlation Between Quality of Life and Severity of Valve Abnormalities in Children with Rheumatic Heart Disease, American Journal of Pediatrics. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2020, pp. 78-82. doi: 10.11648/j.ajp.20200602.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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