Volume 6, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 91-93
Neurocysticercosis in a Child Living in the Urban Community of Yaoundé, Cameroon: A Case Report in a Low Resource Setting
Georges Pius Kamsu Moyo, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon
Audrey Thérese Mbang, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon
Laura Kuate Makowa, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon
Raïssa Monayong Mendomo, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon
Sonia Zebaze, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon
Hubert Désiré Mbassi Awa, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon
Received: Feb. 7, 2020;       Accepted: Feb. 20, 2020;       Published: Mar. 6, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajp.20200602.14      View  320      Downloads  65
Abstract
Background: Neurocysticercosis is a helminthiasis of public health interest in developing countries, where it is potentially responsible for 70% of epilepsy cases. Clinical presentations are diverse and depend on central nervous system localization of the parasite. The diagnosis is based on a number of factors including environmental context, clinical presentation, radiological imaging and serology. The treatment is often medical, with surgery being left for specific cases. Holistic prevention involves prophylaxis, treatment of asymptomatic carriers and reinforcement of health education. Method: We report a case of neurocysticercosis being responsible for a curable form of epilepsy in a Cameroonian child living in the urban community of Yaoundé. The patient was treated exclusively by medical means involving curative and symptomatic medications over a period of 21 days. Results: By the end of the treatment, the patient clinically recovered, though some residual latent cerebral sequels persisted. Conclusion: Neurocysticercosis may be found in children living in urban communities, causing neuropsychic disorders among which epilepsy. Prompt diagnosis may be aided by cerebral radiological imaging such as CT-scan or MRI. The management may be exclusively medical with complete recovery. However, primary prevention is a relevant intervention that may be done by proper disposal of human and animal faeces, rigorous hygiene, effective meat cooking before consumption, health education and prophylaxis with anthelmintics.
Keywords
Cysticercosis, Neurocysticercosis, Epilepsy, Cameroon
To cite this article
Georges Pius Kamsu Moyo, Audrey Thérese Mbang, Laura Kuate Makowa, Raïssa Monayong Mendomo, Sonia Zebaze, Hubert Désiré Mbassi Awa, Neurocysticercosis in a Child Living in the Urban Community of Yaoundé, Cameroon: A Case Report in a Low Resource Setting, American Journal of Pediatrics. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2020, pp. 91-93. doi: 10.11648/j.ajp.20200602.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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